Protect Stash Case For Apple Iphone 7 Plus And 8 Plus - Black/black

protect stash case for apple iphone 7 plus and 8 plus - black/black

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protect stash case for apple iphone 7 plus and 8 plus - black/black

protect stash case for apple iphone 7 plus and 8 plus - black/black protect stash case for apple iphone 7 plus and 8 plus - black/black protect stash case for apple iphone 7 plus and 8 plus - black/black protect stash case for apple iphone 7 plus and 8 plus - black/black protect stash case for apple iphone 7 plus and 8 plus - black/black

protect stash case for apple iphone 7 plus and 8 plus - black/black

In a city like New York, a carrier has to deploy a lot more cell sites to cover the millions of people coming and going each day. Cell sites in New York City tend to be smaller than say in a rural area, such as Wyoming. The reason is there are many more customers to serve per square mile than there are in a rural area like Wyoming. If a cell site goes down, then customers in that area may not receive any service. And in rural areas where there are fewer cell sites, that's more likely. But in places like New York City, where there are hundreds of cell sites in relatively close proximity, users may be able pick up signals from adjacent cell sites. This is likely why people won't have service on one city block, but they will if they move in one direction or another.

But when adjacent cell sites pick up traffic from a cell site that is no longer in the network, it means that those surrounding cell sites are now handling additional customers and additional traffic, Since the cell sites are only able to handle a certain amount of usage, when they become overloaded with additional users, they don't function optimally, What this means for consumers is dropped calls or you won't be able to make calls at all, This is likely what's been happening in lower New York City and other places where cell service is spotty after the storm, But there may be other issues as well, For example, the cell protect stash case for apple iphone 7 plus and 8 plus - black/black sites themselves may not be damaged, but the switching centers or the infrastructure that carries the traffic from those cell sites to the carriers' core networks may be damaged, as well, which could also disrupt service..

I thought the cell sites had weather-proof radios and back-up power supplies. Why are there still outages?. But sometimes this back-up power may fail. Or in the case of this storm there is a chance that flooding may have damaged the power supplies at some sites. Also once those batteries or generators go out, commercial service needs to kick back in or they need to be replaced, recharged or refueled. As for the radio equipment itself, you are also right about the fact that it is hardened for harsh outdoor weather conditions. But 80 to 90 miles per hour wind gusts are strong and can do damage. Also flooding from tidal surges, rain water, as well as, snow and ice can also damage equipment. And let's not forget about flying debris or trees that fall onto transmission towers that may also cause damage during a storm.

Wireless companies can often repair damaged equipment, or they can replace or recharge batteries, But they can only do so once it's safe for technicians to get to affected areas, And they can even bring in temporary and portable towers ready to be deployed to fill in until repairs can be made, These cell-on wheels, or COWS, can be rolled into communities or areas where cell service is disrupted, But they can only do so once it's protect stash case for apple iphone 7 plus and 8 plus - black/black safe for workers to go into those areas, In the case of Hurricane Sandy, which was spread across such a large region, that might take days or in some cases weeks..

If a cell site goes out, does that mean I won't get any service? And if my carrier's service is disrupted could I be able to pick up service from another carrier?. If I live in an area affected by Hurricane Sandy and I have wireless service now does that mean I am in the clear?. That said, even if power remains out, if workers can get to those cell sites and refuel them or replace the batteries, then cell service should continue to work. Still, the FCC said they expect wireless service to get worse before it gets better. So stay tuned.